At Computex 2019, AMD introduced the Zen 2 derived Epyc Rome chips providing more than double the efficiency relative to competing Intel Xeon computers. Sure, team blue called it a hoax and likened the fresh AMD server CPU to their 56 Core Cascade Lake-AP flagship, but the deltas were still not enough to warrant the 4-5 times greater cost. The Epyc Rome SKUs peak at $10,000 with 64 processors and a fat L3 cache. On the other side, the Intel chips are mostly focused in the 18-28 key bracket while costing twice as much while the 56 key behemoth will cost in the $40-50 K spectrum or maybe even more.

In the processor arithmetic exam, the AMD flagship gets an absurd 1565GOPS, earning the complete top place in the memory list (processor arithmetic). I think this is the first of many such accomplishments for team green and we expect to see stronger outcomes in the coming years with the upcoming Milan CPUs centered on the Zen 3 7nm+ architecture. If you look at the top 10 contenders in the SiSoft Database, you’ll see multi-socket devices driven by 2-4 Intel Xeon Platinum components (24-28 units each) and not even two of them can defeat the Epyc flagship in conjunction.

The AMD Epyc “Rome” computer comprises 64 processors and 128 threads operating at a 1.5Ghz and 3.3Ghz foundation and increase respectively. It packs a whopping 256 MB L3 cache and 32 MB L2 cache. This is twice as much again opposed to the more costly Xeon Platinum SKUs. Should assist AMD bring Intel down a few notches in the profitable server room and push them to innovate after all these years of stagnation.